Reasonable Course or Reasonable College, Which Should You Prioritize? | Blogs

Reasonable Course or Reasonable College, Which Should You Prioritize?

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Firstly, there is no such thing as a reasonable course. There can be reasonable colleges, but not courses. That is because colleges can be quantified and compared based on several metrics like teaching staff, infrastructure, campus, methods of learning, laboratories, alumni, placements, location, etc. Courses, on the other hand, have no such scale. No one course is or could ever be better than another. Claiming one course is better than another is like picking up a rock or pebble off the ground and claiming it to be the best rock. Ridiculous.
Courses help in specialising and learning about a particular field, they inculcate in individuals the skills required by industry. Hence the selection of a course should be based on aptitude and interest of an individual. As every individual would prefer to learn about different fields and work in different industries. The verdict for the best course is thus subjective and completely dependent on the individual’s aptitude, ability and interest.
Individuals should decide the best course for themselves first and then a college later on. Not vice versa.
Let us presume a student greatly fancies being a pilot and also has the aptitude for it. What good will a marine engineering course do him even if it is from the world’s best university? His best bet would be to go for aeronautical engineering in a college that offers this course. To finalize the college, they can evaluate all the physical metrics. But whichever college they choose, aeronautical engineering it is.
Most students nowadays have this dilemma because of their misconception of courses and colleges. They think some courses and colleges will propel them higher than others. Parents and other influencers too have got this wrong, and it is passed along onto students. Some questions that students are pounded with by kin and kith are, which college do you prefer, which course do you prefer, which location do you prefer, etc.
course choosing dilemma
Instead, the questions should be, “What do you want to become and do you have the aptitude for it?”, “What must you learn to become that?” and “Which college offering that course fits you best?”. The questions must begin with the self, evaluate if ability meets aspiration, and then pick a course that complements that aspiration. Any course that does not, is not a good course. The term, reasonable course arises from generalizing courses and ignoring the individual. Courses aren’t good or bad in and of themselves. They can be either good for a student or bad for that particular student. It all depends on the individual. This is the piece of the career puzzle that we have willingly misplaced over the years. Finding that innate individuality and placing it first will help solve the puzzle a lot easier and faster.
The questions must begin with self, evaluate if ability meets aspiration, then pick a course that complements aspiration.
There is a problem though. Students, with a little effort and guidance, can identify and evaluate themselves, which is one half of the problem. But amidst the tens of thousands of colleges out there; students and parents evaluating each and every one of them to arrive at a conclusion are not plausible or practical. Enter Navigus. We not only thoroughly evaluate all the colleges but also match them with the student’s individuality aptitude and preferred course recommendations. Every detail is tailored for each student, leaving no space for regret.

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  1. June 13, 2017

    […] no dearth in the variety of courses being offered today, stressing upon the type of course, course structure and curriculum would take you a long […]

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  1. […] no dearth in the variety of courses being offered today, stressing upon the type of course, course structure and curriculum would take you a long […]

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